The Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats

Make sure you check out Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats: A Study in Ruling-Class Cohesiveness 1, 1975. G. William Domhoff, who goes by “Bill,” is a Research Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Born into an apolitical middle-American family in what he and his friends thought of as the Midwest (Ohio), he received his B.A. at Duke University, his M.A. at Kent State University, and his Ph.D. at the University of Miami. He has been teaching at the University of California, Santa Cruz, since 1965.

The Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats

The Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats Review

The Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats: A Study in Ruling-Class Cohesiveness_, published in 1974 by psychologist and sociologist G. William Domhoff, is a fascinating study of several important retreats frequented by elite businessmen, politicians, scientists, artists, and other members of the upper-class elite. These retreats and in particular the Bohemian Grove retreat are infamous for the bizarre rituals which take place during the time spent there and for the often scandalous behavior of otherwise “conservative” businessmen that allegedly takes place there. It has been further maintained by some that during these retreats important policy decisions are embarked upon and indeed it is this fact that makes such retreats so notorious given the fact that what goes on there is not covered by the press. While the Bohemian Grove has for a motto “Weaving Spiders Come Not Here” and includes a bizarre ritual called the “Cremation of Care” in which a body symbolizing the cares of the world is cremated thus serving to remind the businessmen that they are not to engage in politicking while on the retreat, it has nevertheless been maintained that such retreats offer a socially cementing process whereby the elite become unified as a class. Such cohesiveness may ultimately serve to underpin policy decisions which have effects on the United States (and indeed the rest of the world) that serve the interests of the upper-class elite. Domhoff presents the essential thesis that such retreats (while frivolous affairs on the face of it) actually serve a deeper purpose in unifying the upper-class elite which in turn is reflected in the policy decisions of important political figures.